| Home | E-Submission | Sitemap | Contact us |  
top_img
Korean J Med Educ > Volume 13(1); 2001 > Article
Korean Journal of Medical Education 2001;13(1): 91-105. doi: https://doi.org/10.3946/kjme.2001.13.1.91
The Implementation of Problem-based Learning in Kyungpook National University School of Medicine and its Evaluation
Bong Hyun Chang, Yoo Chul Lee, Bo Wan Kim, Duk Sik Kang, Yun Sik Kwak, Echeol Kang, Kang Suk Seo, In Kyeom Kim, Jong Myung Lee, Sung Hoon Jeong, Jong Yeol Kim, In San Kim, Hyeong Jin Kim
1Department of Medical Education, Kyungpook National University School of Medicine.
2Department of Emergency Medicine, Kyungpook National University School of Medicine.
3Department of Pharmacology, Kyungpook National University School of Medicine.
4Department of Internal Medicine, Kyungpook National University School of Medicine.
5Department of Psychiatry, Kyungpook National University School of Medicine.
6Department of Neurology, Kyungpook National University School of Medicine.
7Department of Biochemistry, Kyungpook National University School of Medicine.
8Department of Physiology, Kyungpook National University School of Medicine.
ABSTRACT
The effectiveness of Problem-based Learning(PBL) in medical education has already been acclaimed widely. Representatives of the curriculum committee at Kyungpook National University School of Medicine paid a visit to McMaster University School of Medicine in Canada in May, 1994 in order to learn mechanics and effectiveness of PBL in its medical education and they were impressed by the efficacy of PBL. Soon after that the school launched a pilot PBL tutorial for two years from 1994 through 1996(4-semester) as a non-credit course for senior, junior and sophomore in medical school during one semester each, to introduce PBL to faculty members and students as well. After the pilot, opinion survey on PBL from both faculty and students revealed affirmative for PBL from 55.1% of seniors, 61.4% of juniors and 83.9% of faculty members. The faculty body at medical school was then encouraged by the pilot experience and decided to include the PBL as the part of medical education reform. During the fall semester in 1998, the senior at pre-medical course was given PBL experience to prepare for implementation of PBL at school of medicine. The PBL was implemented as an essential 2-credit-hour course in each semester commencing in 1999 to the freshmen class throughout the year; it was extended to the sophomore in 2000 and to the junior in 2001. Although there had been initial excitements of over expectations, confusion, and disappointments from faculty members and students, majority opinion of both parties on continuation of PBL was positive. The issues to be settled are preparation of study cases, students learning resources, and method of evaluating students' performance. The PBL was started as an essential course in medical school in 1999 after 4 years of preparation and on the basis of our interim evaluations the following conclusions were made: we have reached the following consensus that students seem to follow the objectives of PBL and new PBL tutorial has well been accepted by students; and enhancing the program by correcting currently known weaknesses, the PBL tutorials could further be expanded to be a major modality of teaching in our medical school.
Keywords: Problem-based learning(PBL)
Editorial Office
The Korean Society of Medical Education
(204 Yenji-Dreamvile) 10 Daehak-ro, 1-gil, Jongno-gu, Seoul 03129, Korea
Tel: +82-2-2286-1180   Fax: +82-2-928-1647
E-mail : kjme_office@daum.net
About |  Browse Articles |  Current Issue |  For Authors and Reviewers
Copyright © 2018 by Korean Journal of Medical Education. All rights reserved.                 powerd by m2community